Living a Creative Life without Fear is “Big Magic”

Gilbert’s TED talk on creativity and being creative

interested me in her newest book Big Magic Creative Living Beyond Fear. What draws me to Gilbert’s theories on creativity and creative living is her willingness to embrace mystery and the unknown in regards to the creative process. Her words are a challenge the status quo regarding creatives in general and writers in particular. I’m not going to list them all, but just a few ideas that caught my attention and made me think deeper about the creative process.

CreativeGilbert writes in a clear and encouraging manner, defining living a creative life as “living a life that is driven more strongly about curiosity than by fear” (9) and then writes about how to allow your curiosity to trump your fear. She writes “creative living is a path for the brave. We all know this…fear is a desolate boneyard where our dreams go to desiccate in the hot sun” (13). Fear is a constant companion to those practicing any type of creativity; “This is common knowledge; sometimes we just don’t know what to do about it (13). Gilbert tells you what to do about it, and it isn’t the same tired advice about working through, shoving aside etc. She makes space for her fear; “plenty of space” (24).

It isn’t like a lot of books on creativity I’ve read and that is a good thing. I’ve never bought into the “books are like my children” line of thought; no, my children are far more precious and special than any book I will ever write.

Gilbert, Elizabeth. Big Magic Creative Living Beyond Fear. Riverhead Books: New York. 2015. Print.

Austin Kleon’s “Show Your Work”

Kleon’s Show Your Work

Photo provided by Austin Kleon. showyrwork.com
Photo provided by Austin Kleon. showyrwork.com

Show Your Work 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered is the follow-up (in my mind) to Kleon’s Steal Like an Artist. You’ve created and now want to share with the world your work–what’s the best way to do that?

Not by becoming “human spam. They’re everywhere, and they exist in every profession. They don’t want to pay their dues, they want their piece right here, right now. They don’t want to listen to your ideas; they want to tell you theirs…At some point, they didn’t get the memo that the world owes none of us anything.” (124). You draw attention to your work by “sharing like an artist:”

https://www.flickr.com/photos/deathtogutenberg/12548712844/in/set-72157641021360663/
Back cover provided by Austin Kleon.
showyrwork.com

As with Steal Like An Artist, Show Your Work is packed with wise advice and clever artwork.

Artwork provided by Austin Kleon.  showyrwork.com
Artwork provided by Austin Kleon.
showyrwork.com

The writing is witty and concise, but also though-provoking. Kleon writes “The trouble with imaginative people is that we’re good at picturing the worst that could happen to us. Fear is often just imagination taking a wrong turn. Bad criticism is not the end of the world” (150-151). That resonated with me when I first read it, and still resonates reading it again. This is one of the reasons why the writing works in this book–Kleon writes it as it is. This book sits on my desk by Steal Like An Artist, easy to get to whenever I need it.

 

Kleon, Austin. Show Your Work. New York:Workman Publishing. 2014. Print.