Help #SaveRuminate-Ruminate Literary Journal

Photo property of Ruminate
Photo property of Ruminate

#artmatters and that is why it is so important to #saveRuminate. I’ve subscribed to numerous literary magazines over the years, letting some subscriptions expire, debating with myself about if I should renew or not with others, but with Ruminate, there is never any thought of letting my subscription go. It is one of the few literary journals I’ve held onto throughout the years and not having it around anymore is just to painful to think about. But it could happen. The all-volunteer staff is exhausted and they need paid help to keep going. So—are you in or out? I’ve made a donation, signed up for a monthly donation and for today and tomorrow subscriptions and gift subscriptions go to saving Ruminate.

Literary Citizenship Wants You

from the South85 blog:

“Yes, you. The concept behind literary citizenship is a simple one—become involved in the reading/writing community to support the work of others. It’s not that difficult to do, really. It requires time, but what worthy endeavor doesn’t? Does lit citizenship require money? If you have it to spend in a literary way, great, but even if you don’t, you can still be a solid lit citizen and grow the community.”

Read the rest of the post at South85

Fifth week roundup

This post is a collection of all the blogs posts since our last roundup.

Starter House–A Ghost Story

Author Interview-Sonja Condit, author of Starter House

The Spice of Backstory in Condit’s Starter House

Cheesecloth Removal: The Poet’s Companion by Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux

You Live Where? Strange Settings in Judy Budnitz’s Nice Big American Baby

Lit Mag Roundup

Just Right Love Poem

Slaughter House Five–Not Just Another War Story

All That was Faked Turned Bad: Hemingway and the Gift of Unruly Prose

North of Hope–A Daughter’s Arctic Journey

The Gift of Focused Power in the First Person Point of View

Marking Time

Punctuate Bodies in Rebecca Thrill’s “Punctuation”

Literary Citizen and Why You Should Be One #litcitizen

What Led Zepplin Teaches Me About Writing

The Night Circus

 

 

South85 Journal

South85stack-1South85 Journal is the official literary journal of the Converse College Low-Residency MFA Program.

“I won’t change anything the first year,” I said to both retiring Editor-in-Chief Sarah Gray and Contributing Editor Rick Mulkey when I took over as Editor-in-Chief of South85 Journal this past December.

That was before I led my first staff meeting at the Converse Low-Residency MFA program, where I was inspired by the enthusiasm of the staff.  Not only did all of the previous staff members (except Sarah Gray, of course) decide to stay, but quite a few new people joined us:  David Colodney, Kristi Hébert, Rebecca Landau, Connie Thompson, and Jacob Allard.

I left the meeting with my mind racing with ideas about what to do with everyone who was interested in serving our journal.  Improvements I knew we needed to make – like a weekly blog, a social media presence, a review section for the journal, and a brand – became possible immediately rather than in the months – or even years – to come. We now have a Blog Editor, a Review Editor, an Artistic Director, and a Social Media Director.

With these new positions, we have created a logo, redesigned our site, started posting to our blog weekly, begun conversations on Facebook and Twitter, and planned reviews for our upcoming issues.  In addition, we have kept up with our regular task of reviewing work submitted to us for our 2014 issue.

So, if you haven’t visited our website lately (or ever), please stop by.  If you like what you see, here are three ways you can support us…  and none of them involving donating or spending any money: `

1.  Read

One of the most important things you can do for any literary journal to read  it. As much as writers say they write for the love of writing, writers also want to be read. And without readers, there would be no reason for literary journals to exist. So, check out our past issues. If you like what you see, sign up for our e-mail newsletter, and we’ll let you know when the next issue is available. Also, visit our weekly blog for a little literary inspiration. You can subscribe to it using your favorite RSS reader, or sign up to receive posts in your inbox.

2.  Contribute

If you are a reader, a writer, or an artist, we want to see your work! If you love to read and want to tell others about good books, join our staff as a reviewer. If you’re a writer or an artist, you can contribute your work to our journal. Our reading period ends April 30, so don’t delay if you have something good to show us! We are looking for poetry, creative non-fiction essays, short stories, and visual art. Also, we have a weekly blog where you can share your thoughts on all things literary with other likeminded people. Visit our submissions guidelines page for information on all of these categories.

3.  Participate

We are not a static, stuffy journal of the past! We want our readers and contributors to be a part of the conversation. Plug in by following us on Twitter and liking us on Facebook. We are planning some fun contests using these two outlets starting this summer, so you don’t want to miss them.

Thanks in advance for your support!  We look forward to seeing you online, and please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any ideas about how we can improve our journal.

Debby DeRosa holds a BA in English from the University of South Carolina-Columbia and an MFA in Creative Writing from Converse College.  In addition to being Editor-in-Chief of South85 Journal, she is the Marketing Manager of Five Star Plumbing Heating Cooling in Greer, SC, and she freelances as a copywriter and content developer.

 

Journal Focus

Image Journal: Bridging Faith and Imagination. Their blog “Good Letters
From Image’s About page: A culture is governed by its reigning myths. However, in the latter days of the twentieth century, there is an uneasy sense that materialism cannot sustain or nourish our common life. Thankfully, religion and art have always shared the capacity to help us to renew our awareness of the ultimate questions: who we are, where we have come from, and where we are going. Read more at the above link-Bridging Faith and Imagination. Publishes poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction

Ruminate   From Ruminate’s About page: ru’mi-nate: to chew the cud; to muse; to meditate; to think again; to ponder. Ruminate is a quarterly magazine of short stories, poetry, creative nonfiction, and visual art that resonate with the complexity and truth of the Christian faith. Each issue is a themed forum for literature and art that speaks to the existence of our daily lives while nudging us toward a greater hope. Because of this, we strive to publish quality work accounting for the grappling pleas, as well as the quiet assurances of an authentic faith. Ruminate Magazine was created for every person who has paused over a good word, a real story, a perfect brushstroke— longing for the significance they point us toward. Please join us.

Ruminate’s Blog:

Tin House-check out their latest issue. A story by Stephen King. Interviews of Margaret Atwood and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and much, much more. Blog

Unstuck publishes once a year. From their about page: Unstuck is an independent, nonprofit annual based in Austin, Texas. We emphasize literary fiction with elements of the fantastic, the futuristic, or the surreal—a broad category that would include the work of writers as diverse as Abe, Ballard, Borges, Calvino, Tutuola, and (of course) Vonnegut. In our pages, you’ll find everything from straight-up science fiction and fantasy to domestic realism with a twist of the improbable. We feature a mix of established and emerging fiction writers from both the genre and literary publishing communities. We also publish a limited selection of poems and essays. Interviews and Excerpts

Coconut Poetry. Submission guidelines

Literary Magazine Highlight-Glimmer Train, Slice

Support for literary magazines is crucial. Here is a short sampling of some of the literary magazines I’m familiar with:

Glimmer Train is a literary magazine that publishes quarterly. The magazine publishes strictly short stories and each issue is approximately 200 pages. Each issue comes with a bookmark to mark your place in the event you have to put it down before you’ve finished reading. The covers are colorful and each story includes a childhood picture of the author, with a personal comment from the author about the picture’s importance–an aspect of the magazine I really enjoy reading.

In addition to their magazine, they also publish a quarterly newsletter Writers Ask, a great little resource for both serious writers and readers of literary fiction. It’s been a while since I’ve gotten this, but I just signed up for a new subscription, and I plan on keeping each issue in a binder.

Glimmer Train also has a free bulletin. A sample is here and if you want to sign up for it, scroll to the bottom of the home page. This bulletin is well-worth reading–it contains essays from established authors, news on the latest contests, and other informative information. It’s always free, so there’s no reason not to sign up for this valuable resource. From the last issue: Allison Amend’s letter to her younger writing self.

Here is information on regular submissions or contests. Glimmer Train pays both contest winners and those chosen for publication in their magazine.

*

Slice is a literary magazine based in Brooklyn, New York. Slice publishes poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction. It is a paying magazine, and is published twice a year. Their next reading period is June 1-August 1; guidelines are here. Issues are well-put together–in content and in physical appearance. Each issue is substantial–this magazine just feels good in your hands. My favorites are the author interviews and the fiction, but I find myself reading each issue cover to cover.

The Slice and Dice section contains an interview of author Eric Larson (The Devil in the White City, In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin); a weekly podcastEncounters in Publishing-short essays on the publishing world, (check out the sidebar for Encounters in a Bookstore); and information on their conference and New York City events.

Those are just some of my favorites. Feel free to add your favorite literary magazine in the comments section.

Contributor News-Rhonda Browning White

Contributor Rhonda Browning White has a post on Ploughshare’s Writing Lessons blog where she writes about her experience as a student in Converse College‘s low-residency MFA program

Blogs you should be reading

in addition to this one. 🙂

From the Beyond the Margins about page: Beyond The Margins is…. A blog, a sounding board, a daily dose of insight. It offers essays on the craft of writing and the business of publishing. There are tips on creating memorable scenes and great dialogue. Interviews with authors, editors and agents. Humorous pokes at the craft, the industry and at ourselves. Think literary magazine run amok.

Does sorting through the myriad literary magazines available make your head spin? The Review Review is a site that, well, reviews literary magazines. New Pages is also a site that maintains a database of literary magazines, literary magazine reviews, contests, publishers and more. Poets and Writers also maintains databases of MFA programs, literary magazines and more at their Tools For Writers page.

If you’re a recent MFA grad, or soon-to-graduate from an MFA program, here’s a new blog worth following: MFA Day Job

What other writing-related blogs are worth following? List them in the comments–inappropriate links will be deleted.